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A taste of heaven

“OVER THE NEXT FEW HOURS, I WILL HAVE A CHANCE TO SEE, FEEL AND MOST OF ALL TASTE THE REAL MAURITIUS.”

Extracts from Lufthansa Magazine:

Stamp collectors flock here from around the world, three quarters of them from Germany, but I’m not one of them. I’m more interested in meeting the historian Shakti Callikan, 36 –  half Indian and half French, and very beautiful, too. “Most tourists to Mauritius spend all day on the beach and never leave their hotels. The only local people they meet are the pool boy or the waiter.” She wants to change that with her small My Moris agency.

Over the next few hours, I will have a chance to see, feel and most of all taste the real Mauritius.

Amina, 60, has yellow teeth and a broad grin, and makes the best roti in town: paper-thin flatbread filled with thick curry and water spinach. She has been cooking, baking and smiling beneath the tower of the Jummah Mosque for the last ten years. “Around 17 percent of the islanders are Muslim,” says Shakti as I chew. After Hindus (52 percent) and Christians (30 percent), they’re the third-largest religious group on this island of Eden.The Indian Muslims of Port Louis have been trading in spices for generations. Lentils and chili peppers of every possible color are displayed on 19th-century wooden shelves in shops hidden behind black basalt walls.

Click here to read the full article on the culinary experience in Mauritius (in German too!)